Burwood Methodist Church
(now Greek Orthodox)
Station Street, Burwood

Alfred Hunter & Son 1893, 3 manuals, 29 speaking stops, tubular-pneumatic action
destroyed 1971







From SOJ April/May 1992, Kelvin Hastie writes:

The depressed economic circumstances of the 1890s resulted in a sharp decline in organ building activity in NSW. In spite of this, a magnificent instrument of three manuals, 29 speaking stops, 7 couplers and tubular-pneumatic action was opened in the Burwood Church on 9 August, 1893. It was installed as a memorial to the Rev. George Hurst; the cost was estimated as near to £1,000. The church was enlarged to take the instrument and a chamber was built on the western side of the building with cases facing the chancel and nave. Further descriptions were outlined in the Methodist:

[It] "was built by Messrs. Hunter & Sons, London, the specifications having been prepared by Mr. F. Morley, of Sydney, and the work superintended by his brother, Mr F. Morley, MA, Mus Bac, of Cambridge. The workmanship and tone of this noble instruemt are beyond praise... It is blown by a noiseless hydraulic engine, and contains every modern appliance. The case was designed by Mr H.C. Kent MA. The City Organist [Auguste Wiegend] has pronounced a most favourable opinion."


Photo from the Uniting Church Archives Collection


From SOJ Summer 2006-2007, Dr Kelvin Hastie writes:

The combined problems of changing demographics (notably an influx of southern-European migrants in the 1960s) and too many buildings within too small a radius forced the Methodist and Congregational Churches in Burwood to consider their futures. It was decided to close the Methodist building and sell the property to the Greek Orthodox Church, while forming a joint parish using the Congregational Church in Burwood Road. It was intended to relocate the splendid Hunter organ to the Congregational Church, but the work of dismantling in 1970 was undertaken by volunteers who damaged a great deal of the pipework in the process. Although several ranks were rescued and re-used to enlarge the 1955 Fincham in Wesley Church, Canberra, the instrument should be considered lost. It had survived for over 75 years, requiring very little work during that time, apart from an overhaul by S.T. Noad & Son in 1963. Interestingly, in keeping with the fashion for upperwork at that time, the Choir Viol d'Amour 8' stop was transposed to form a Nazard 2-2/3', representing the only tonal modification to have affected the instrument. As the largest organ sent by Hunter to Australia and as one of the largest 19th century organs installed in a Sydney church, this was an instrument of national significance, and was one held in high regard by all who had the good fortune to play and hear it.


Photo from the Uniting Church Archives Collection

Its specification was:

Great
Double Diapason
Large Open Diapason
Small Open Diapason
Stopped Diapason
Principal
Flute Harmonic
Fifteenth
Mixture
Posaune

Swell
Lieblich Double
Open Diapason
Lieblich Gedacht
Gamba
Voix Celeste
Gemshorn
Flautina
Mixture
Horn
Oboe
Tremulant

Choir
Double Dulciana TC
Lieblich Gedacht
Dulciana
Viol d'Amour
Flute
Piccolo
Clarinet

Pedal
Open Diapason
Bourdon
Violoncello

Couplers
Great to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Choir to Pedal
Swell to Great
Swell to Choir
Swell Octave
Swell to Great Octave

16
8
8
8
4
4
2
III
8


16
8
8
8
8
4
2
III
8
8



16
8
8
8
4
2
8


16
16
8





































transposed 1963 S.T. Noad to make a Nazard 2-2/3


















Compass 56/30
Tubular-pneumatic action
3 pistons to Swell
4 pistons to Great
Angled stop jambs



The Greek Orthodox Church, Burwood (formerly Methodist)


The current interior of the Greek Orthodox Church, Burwood

Photos MQ 2006