Residence of Dr Brett McKern

Camden Park

(previously at Macquarie Park)

 

B.1989 Rodgers Organ Company
Reb. 2014 various.

2m, 16 sp.st, 8c, 2 rks ext, el.mag.
Gt: 16.8.8.4.4.2⅔.2. Sw: 8.4.4.2⅔.2. Ped: 8.5⅓.4.4.



Historical and Technical Documentation by Brett McKern
© OMSS 2014 (last updated March 2014)


This instrument was built in 1989 as the two ranks of 'wind-blown' pipes for a Rodgers electronic organ. It played the following stops on a floating Positiv division and duplicated some stops on the Great:

Positiv
Bourdon
Principal
Flute
Octave
Quint
Pipe Tremulant

8
4
4
2
1-1/3

   

 

At this time, both ranks were extended 4' to 2' ranks, the bass of the Bourdon being provided electronically. The Rodgers hybrid organ did duty during pipe organ restorations and on completion of this work was offered for sale. After years unsold, the pipes and electronic components were separated and the current owner bought the pipe division. It was removed from the previous installation and the pipework cleaned by Peter D.G. Jewkes.

It was intended the pipes would form a small extension organ, playable via MIDI, from any MIDI-equipped keyboard, organ console or computer. Consequently it was designed without its own console, but would form a complete instrument of itself as opposed to a hybrid organ. An 8' stopped bass octave was added using redundant Kendall pipes on a chest built by Darrall Pitchford.

The note switching system works via MIDI. A 'stop box', like a mini console, controls the stops. These systems were designed and built by Craig Hall of Custom Midi Organ Solutions. Rotary switches beneath each division of drawstops enable the MIDI channel to be selected for each division. Finally, Mark Fisher of Pipe Organ Reconstructions re-voiced the pipework.

With only two ranks, versatility is important in a practice instrument played daily, so many extended stops and couplers afford many different sound combinations. Originally 4' stops were envisaged as the highest pitch, but with both ranks already having 2' octaves, higher stops were included in the final design. While the secondary division is not a traditional Swell, it is called that for convenience (most MIDI consoles have Great and Swell divisions). All pipework is unenclosed. The final specification is:

Great
Bourdon
Open Diapason
Stopped Diapason
Principal
Flute
Twelfth
Fifteenth
Swell Super-Octave to Great
Swell to Great
Swell Sub-Octave to Great

Swell
Lieblich Gedact
Principal
Flute
Nazard
Piccolo
Swell Super-Octave
Swell Sub-Octave
Principal Tremulant
Flute Tremulant

Pedal
Bass Flute
Quint
Choral Bass
Octave Flute
Swell Octave to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Great to Pedal

16
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2





8
4
4
2-2/3
2






8
5-1/3
4
4




B
A
B
A
B
A
A





B
A
B
B
B






B
B
A
B




TC
(grooved to 8' stopped bass)




























 


It is currently played via MIDI from the owner's Wyvern Concerto II digital organ.
















Photographs:  B McKern (March 2014)